National Association of Broadcasters celebrates All Things Considered

‘All Things Considered’ to be inducted into America’s NAB Broadcasting Hall of Fame.

All Things Considered (ATC), the flagship news program of NPR, will be inducted into the National Association of Broadcasters Broadcasting Hall of Fame at the 2021 NAB Show, held October 9–13 in Las Vegas.

“For a half a century, ‘All Things Considered’ has engaged, educated and entertained countless listeners about the news and culture affecting our lives, while serving as a showcase for the importance of public radio. It is a fitting tribute that we induct this landmark program of radio history into the Broadcasting Hall of Fame as it celebrates its 50th year on the air.”

-NAB President CEO Gordon Smith

ATC made its debut broadcast 50 years ago on May 3, 1971, airing on 90 public radio stations. Now broadcasting live every weekday for two hours and for one hour every Saturday and Sunday, ATC is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time news radio program in the country.

Hosted by Chang, Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly and Ari Shapiro and on weekends by Michel Martin, ATC airs coverage of the most important news of the day, reports from NPR correspondents in the U.S. and around the world, thoughtful commentaries, interviews with newsmakers and features on arts, music and entertainment.

ATC has been honored with some of journalism’s highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award. The NAB Broadcasting Hall of Fame recognizes radio and television personalities or programs that have earned a place in broadcasting history.

The National Association of Broadcasters is the most famous advocacy association for America’s broadcasters. NAB advances radio and television interests in legislative, regulatory and public affairs. Through advocacy, education and innovation, NAB enables broadcasters to best serve their communities, strengthen their businesses and seize new opportunities in the digital age. Learn more at www.nab.org.

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